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Citations

Reads

h-index

RG ScoreRecommendations

Improving your stats

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Reads is a simple metric designed to show you exactly how often your work and other people’s publications are accessed onlineoften research is being accessed on ResearchGate, in real time. 

We count and display the number of reads for each publication on ResearchGate, each question asked and answer added in Q&A, every project, and all project updates.

You can find out how many Reads your publications on ResearchGate reads your research items are getting each week, which of your publications , which are getting the most most reads, and which institutions and countries your reads are coming from.

The reads breakdown shows you how people are reading your work, and if the researcher permits it, you'll Your weekly stats report shows you which of your research items people are reading. You will also be able to see exactly who has 's recently read your work . This offers a unique opportunity and to connect with peers who are interested in your research. 

You'll only be able to see who has read your work if they have their profile activity set to be publicly visible. 


How are reads calculated? 

read is counted when somebody:

  • Reads the full-text or summary of any type of research (e.g., journal article, conference paper, dataset) on ResearchGate
  • Downloads a file hosted on ResearchGate, including direct downloads from Google Scholar and other search engines
Reads are counted

For a publication, a ‘read’ is counted each time someone views the publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure linked to the publication (either directly on the publication page or via the home feed), or views or downloads the full-text, if there is one.

To show how engaged viewers are with your research, you will also be able to see the full-text reads metric for your own publications. For publications, a ‘full-text read‘ is counted each time someone views or downloads the full-text. The full-text reads metric shows how many of your reads come from full-text views or downloads.

For questions and projects, a ‘read’ is counted each time someone views the question or project page.  A ‘read’ of a project update or an answer in Q&A is only counted if someone looks at that particular project update or answer.   

To show the full reach of your work, we count reads from both logged in ResearchGate members and logged out readers.

To make sure sure reads gives  gives you an accurate picture of the attention your research is getting, a read isn't counted when you or one of your co-authors access your own publication, when you view your own question, answer, or project update, or if you or a collaborator looks at one of your own publicationsprojects. It is also not counted when your work is accessed by an artificial traffic source .(such as a robot or bot).  We're continuously working on improving our ability to detect different sources of artificial traffic to make sure we show you accurate metrics.

Please get in touch if you notice anything unusual with your stats.

What is the reads breakdown?

 

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The interactive pie chart on your stats page under the section titled Reads breakdown gives you a simple way to see how people are reading your work. There are five types of reads that are presented in the reads breakdown: On-page reads, Summary reads, Private sharesFile downloads, and Figure reads. You can hover your mouse over each of the sections on the pie chart to see more details for each type of read.

 

What are the types of reads in the reads breakdown exactly? 

There are five kinds of reads that can be displayed in the reads breakdown.

On-page reads are counted when a researcher reads a publication on its ResearchGate page.

Summary reads are counted when a publication that is accessed only has metadata available, such as the title, abstract, and list of authors.

Private shares are counted when a researcher downloads a publication after receiving it via the Request full-text button on ResearchGate.

File downloads includes cases when a researcher downloads a publication hosted on ResearchGate, such as from a publication's ResearchGate page, or from a scholarly search engine such as Google Scholar.

Figure reads are counted someone reads a publication's figures directly from its ResearchGate page or directly from the home feed. 

 

We're continuously working on improving our ability to detect different sources of artificial traffic to make sure we show you accurate metrics. Please get in touch if you notice anything unusual with your stats.

Why have my stats decreased?

Your stats and those of others

 



Why have my stats decreased?

There are a few possible reasons why your reads statistics may have decreased. The reads counter on your Profile Overview is based on your activity and on the research items in your Research tab. If a research item is removed from your Research tab, deleted from ResearchGate, or merged with a duplicate item, the item's reads will also be removed. 

Reads may also decrease when a full-text file is removed from a publication page. Reads and full-text reads that come from full-text views or downloads are linked to the specific full-text file that was viewed. If a full-text file is removed from a publication page, the associated reads and full-text reads will also be removed.

Your stats and those of others may have decreased because we’ve been working extensively to give you a more accurate picture of the attention your research is getting onlineon ResearchGate.

As part of this, we’ve removed we remove traffic from artificial sources from our members’ stats. This means that visits by automated programs like crawlers and bots, which remotely load pages and download content to retrieve information, aren’t counted. Reads also aren’t counted when you access or one of your co-authors accesses one of your own publications, you view your own question, answer, figure, or project update, or you or a collaborator looks at one of your own projects. 

We're continuously working on detecting unusual patterns of activity that could skew your stats. Please get back in touch if you notice anything unusual — we appreciate your feedback.