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What is the h-index
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Research Interest

Citations

Reads

Recommendations

Mentions

Improving your stats

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The 

h-index is a simple way to measure the impact of your work and other peoples' research. It does this by looking at the number of highly impactful publications a researcher has published. The higher the number of cited publications, the higher the h-index, regardless of which journal the work was published in.

 

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titleHow is the h-index calculated on ResearchGate?

The h-index is calculated based on 2 bits of information: the total number of papers published (Np) and the number of citations (Nc) for each paper. It is defined by how many h of a researcher’s publications (Np) have at least h citations each.This means that if you have 1 publication with at least 1 citation, your h-index is 1, if you have 2 publications with at least 2 citations each, your h-index would be 2, and so on. 

On ResearchGate, you'll see two separate h-indices displayed for each author. The first metric is an h-index that includes self-citations. The second h-index displayed excludes self-citations so that anyone looking at the numbers can compare them and quickly gauge whether other authors are paying attention to a researcher's work.

Please note: The h-index takes into account only citations of your work from scientific literature, reflecting impact in the scientific community. Furthermore, it is calculated based on the publications in your profile. You can help us make sure your h-index accurately represents your impact by adding all of your work to your profile.

 

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titleHow do I improve my h-index?

You can make sure that you have the highest possible h-index for your research by making sure that you add all of your work on ResearchGate. It is especially important to make sure that all of your publications that have been cited are on your profile to help improve your h-index. However, adding other work that hasn't yet been cited or has only been cited infrequently is a great way to create exposure for it, leading to more citations.  

Stats tab shows you in-depth stats about your research to help you measure the attention your work is getting online. You can see a historical overview of your stats in simple, interactive graphs. You’ll see how often your work has been read, cited, and recommended, and by whom. You’ll also get more information on which country and institution your readers come from, as well as which of your publications are read most each week. 


The Scores tab shows you two ways of measuring your impact as a researcher – the h-index and the RG Score. The h-index is a simple way to measure the impact of your research based on citations. And the RG Score is our very own metric that measures scientific reputation based on how both your published research and contributions on ResearchGate are received by your peers.